News Archive
The state of Linux accessibility

Following article by Robert Cole, a blind (severely low-vision) Linux user, on the state of Linux accessibility is actually praising the AEGIS or GNOME Shell Magnifier when he praises the state of Linux accessibility.

Read the article here.

 
Production of accessible documents with free open source tools

The production of accessible documents with free open source tools developed in the AEGIS project (odt2daisy, odt2braille, AccessODF) (created by Christophe Strobbe and Karel Van Isacker, subtitles by Karen Mardahl).

 
AEGIS at the TES Resources North and Special Needs North event

AEGIS was present at the TES Resources North and Special Needs North event this weekend.

NTU team at TES event

 
Tecla positively embraced at International Conference on Digital Inclusion and Learning

The International Conference on Digital Inclusion and Learning a the Rey Juan Carlos University on 19 April presented a project (University guidance services for universal accessibility and mobility) about outdoors and indoor guidance for people with disability and they talked about Tecla (AEGIS outcome) and the tests done by people with motor disabilities. They said the results were very positive for this type of user.

 
Multimodal speech- and body gesture-based text input system ... with AEGIS input

At this link, you can download a paper (use the "View on wise..." link) on SpeeG, which combines a modified version of Dasher, Sphinx and Microsoft's Kinect sensor to create a system for multimodal input. See also this link.

SpeeG is a multimodal speech- and body gesture-based text input system targeting media centres, set-top boxes and game consoles. The controller-free zoomable user interface combines speech input with a gesture-based real-time correction of the recognised voice input. While the open source CMU Sphinx voice recogniser transforms speech input into written text, Microsoft's Kinect sensor is used for the hand gesture tracking. A modified version of the zoomable Dasher interface (AEGIS outcome) combines the input from Sphinx and the Kinect sensor. In contrast to existing speech error correction solutions with a clear distinction between a detection and correction phase, the innovative SpeeG text input system enables continuous real-time error correction. An evaluation of the SpeeG prototype has revealed that low error rates for a text input speed of about six words per minute can be achieved after a minimal learning phase. Moreover, in a user study SpeeG has been perceived as the fastest of all evaluated user interfaces and therefore represents a promising candidate for future controller-free text input.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 22